holocaust-studies3 - Blog

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Cohort V’s Visit to the Lublin Ghetto: Death and Camp Pride

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Students Chenda and Coos standing in the gas chamber, this one was used for the disinfection of clothes.

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Student Anat looking into a storage room for Zyklon B pellets.

Recently, Cohort V took a study tour through Poland, with our guide John Phillips. Our first day in Poland, we drove to Majdanek and spent the day there, learning about the death camp. The first building we went through were the disinfection and gas chambers, which were still stained blue from the Zyklon B pellets.

When we left the building, one of our students shared about an artist that she research through the Ghez Collection course, Léon Weissberg. Weissberg was born in Przeworsk, Poland in 1895, and studied in the art academies of Vienna and Munich. In 1923, he moved to Paris, the heart of the avant garde. Weissberg had a wife and daughter who was born and raised in Paris. He was best known for his Parisian cityscapes and circus scenes. After the Nazis invaded France, he escaped with his family to the South of France but they were betrayed by two French Vichy policemen. They were arrested and sent to Gurs concentration camp in February 1943, and on March 6, 1943 Weissberg was deported to Majdanek death camp.

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A Nation Destroyed: An Existential Approach to the Distinctive Harm of Genocide

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In his recent article in the Journal of Genocide Research, Professor Shmuel Lederman – a professor a the  Weiss Livnat International MA Studies Program in Holocaust Studies at the University of Haifa – examines the distinctive harm of genocide. He makes specific reference to Hannah Arendt’s conceptualization of the harm of genocide, positing that despite its flaws it brings a valuable perspective to the issue.

Lederman opens by citing the views of historians who distinguish the harm of genocide as stemming from the loss to the world of a unique culture. As he notes, culture is difficult to quantify. If one understands culture as referring primarily to high culture, one would have to argue that the genocide of the Jews is ‘worse’ than the genocide of the Roma, who have not made the same level of cultural contribution. On the other hand, Lederman writes, one could approach cultural loss as the destruction of a distinct way of life. This viewpoint is also difficult to defend, since for example the majority of German Jewry killed in the Holocaust were assimilated into German society and did not live in any way that differentiated them from their non-Jewish compatriots.

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Yitzhak Weiss-Livant’s Legacy

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With a heavy heart, we announce the death of Yitzhak Weiss-Livnat in late March, 2017. The Livnat family invited Cohort V to the funeral which was held March 28. We were fortunate to have Yitzhak Livnat as a central element to our program, every cohort since the inception of the program has heard Yitzhak’s testimony.

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Holocaust Hospitality: Michal Rovner’s Living Landscape at Yad Vashem

PerryWriting in the journal History and Memory in 2016, art historian Rachel Perry of the University of Haifa’s Holocaust Studies Program considers the impact and implications of Living Landscape, the entrance art installation created by Michal Rovner at Yad Vashem’s new Holocaust History museum. Perry discusses the message and thematic expression of Living Landscape as embodying the message of the new Holocaust History museum, with reference to the concept of hospitality as conveyed by Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida.

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Inciting Hate through Posters, Films, and Exhibitions: German Anti-Jewish Propaganda in the Generalgouvernement, 1939–1945

Dr. Jan GrabowskiJan Grabowski is a professor of history at the University of Ottawa. In the academic year of 2017-18 he will be teaching on online course to the students of Weiss-Livnat International MA program on the Jews of Poland during the Holocaust.

In his 2009 article for the journal Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Professor Jan Grabowski of the University of Ottawa discusses the little-examined issue of the German anti-Jewish propaganda that was distributed in the General Gouvernement (GG) area of Poland during the years of German invasion and occupation, from 1939 to 1945. He notes the resources that were dedicated to this branch of propaganda in particular, with the use of visual media and the involvement of Polish artists and existing Polish anti-semitic material.

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Multi-Disciplinary Approach in Holocaust Studies

MultidisciplinaryThe Weiss-Livnat International MA in Holocaust Studies offers an array of multidisciplinary courses that support a core of historical studies that provide our students with a holistic approach. The students come to the program with differing backgrounds and research goals and become specialists in their unique fields through our multidisciplinary program.

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Holocaust and Genocide Memorialization Policies in the Western Balkans and Israel/Palestine

lea david photoIn a recent article the journal Peacebuilding, Professor Lea David, for the Weiss-Livnat International MA Program in Holocaust Studies at the University of Haifa, discusses the consequences of human rights-based Holocaust and genocide memorialization policies on conflict and post-conflict situations. She examines the effects of such policies on specifically Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovnia after the 1990s Balkans conflict, and on Israel/Palestine.

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Strochliz Institute for Holocaust Research
University of Haifa
1 Abba Hushi Blvd.
Mt. Carmel, Haifa 3478601,
Israel.
Tel: +972+48240613
9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Sunday through Thursday
email: ygranot@univ.haifa.ac.il