holocaust-studies3 - Blog

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Michael GansMichael Gans, the United States

mgans@aol.com

Michael Gans is Director of Cultural Competence for a Holocaust Survivor Program, a RCSWI, and PhD candidate researching abuse, homophobia, mass-genocide and the transference of transgenerational trauma. He has been invited to speak at Yad Vashem, several international universities and is a self-taught filmmaker whose film, Jew Street, won two major awards.  He is an adjunct lecturer and co-creator of the I-witness Holocaust Field School in which university students explore ways mass-genocide is memorialized in Europe. Through clinical social work, Michael seeks to help clients grow and re-story their personal, familial and national narratives rooted in their traumatic memory of abuse, homophobia, slavery, forced displacement, or genocide.

תמונת-ראש-נעהNoa Gidron

Cohort I

Thesis: Jews saving Jews – Individual Initiatives during the Holocaust, 1939-1945

Experience: Volunteer at the Ghetto Fighters’ House Archive since October 2014.

Conferences

  • Gidron, N. “Jewish Physicians rescuing Jews during the Holocaust, 1939-1945” at the 17th Nahariya Conference on Medicine and the Holocaust

justifyinggenocide

We are delighted to report that Professor Stefan Ihrig has been awarded the 2017 Dr. Sona Aronian Book Prize for excellence in Armenian Studies

Stefan, who joined the faculty in 2016, was recognised by The National Association for Armenian Studies and Research (NAASR) for his book Justifying Genocide: Germany and the Armenians from Bismarck to Hitler (Harvard University Press).

Reacting to the announcement, Stefan said: “I am very humbled to be awarded the Sonia Aronian Prize and thank NAASR and my wonderful colleagues in the field of Armenian Studies.

“I have so far only spent a few years of my life working on the Armenian Genocide and yet they have been among the most meaningful of them all.”

Many congratulations, Stefan.

Alongside Stefan, Abraham Terian was also commended for his translation of a literary work, The Festal Works of St. Gregory of Narek: Annotated Translation of the Odes, Litanies, and Encomia (Pueblo Books).

The full story can be read here, courtesy of Armenian Weekly.

dapimWe are happy to announce the publication of a new issue of Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust!

Please take a look at the newest addition of Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust at the link below:

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rdap20/31/3?nav=tocList

s200_carol.kidron

Dr. Carol Kidron is a senior lecturer in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Haifa. She teaches Anthropology of Memory, Trauma and Commemoration in the Weiss-Livnat International MA Program in Holocaust Studies.

At the start of her career, Dr. Kidron researched the collective memory and transmitted trauma of second and third generation Holocaust survivors. She then began to compare it with other groups who suffered genocide to assess whether or not the way Jews approach the memory and commemoration of the Holocaust is universal. Dr. Kidron closely examines the case of Cambodia. She found that there is a very different view among descendants of survivors of the Cambodian Genocide and descendants of Holocaust survivors. Overall, Dr. Kidron found that many Cambodians are disinterested in the genocide. Dr. Kidron attributes this in part to Buddhism’s role in their lives. Contrary to Judaism, Buddhism is not so concerned with the past and stresses the importance of the present and the future. Under the Buddhist perspective, one should accept their karma and move forward. Furthermore, through the Buddhist perspective, the suffering of the genocide is not different to other instances of suffering and therefore does not hold an overly special place in the collective memory of Cambodians.

As well as providing our students with a strong historical foundation of the Holocaust, students of our multi-disciplinary program have the opportunity to enrol in a wide range of courses that cover a number of academic approaches, such as psychology, anthropology, museum studies and genocide studies. Some of the multi-disciplinary courses offered to our students this year are:

olgaOlga Kartashova, Russia

What brought you to the University of Haifa?

After completion of an MA in Comparative History and Jewish studies at the Central European University in Budapest, I had in hand a decision to devote myself to the career of a Holocaust scholar and pursue further opportunities in academia. What supported my decision was a serious reputation of this very “young” program worldwide and the recommendations of alumni. And, of course, discovering Israel by living here for a year seemed to be a great adventure.

Interests within the field of Holocaust Studies:

My main interests in the field are the history of the Holocaust in Poland and in the USSR and its aftermath, memorialization, politics of memory, mythology, historiography, and war crimes trials in Eastern Europe. At the moment I am beginning the research on the trials of Nazi crimes in Poland just after the war. I am interested in how Jewish, Polish and Soviet agencies together with Nuremberg Tribunal formed the memory of Holocaust and helped to remember/forget the crimes connected to Nazi death camps in Poland.