holocaust-studies3 - Student Research

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STUDENT RESEARCH


Written in Transport: Deportee Letters and the Influence of an Iconic Poem

SimonGoldbergby Simon Goldberg

This thesis explores the expressions of personal collapse articulated by Holocaust victims inside deportation trains. Looking at transport through both a historical and a literary lens, it examines letters written on trains to concentration and death camps alongside Israeli Dan Pagis’ “Written in Pencil in the Sealed Railway Car.” An interdisciplinary examination of Holocaust transport also enables a reflection on what each discipline cannot do in isolation, and as such what each lens—the poem and the letters—brings the other.

 

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Contextualizing Transformation: A Case Study of Pilgrimage to Poland

Shelby Weltzby Shelby Weltz

In this paper, I qualitatively investigate the effect of the Poland pilgrimage on a sample of Modern Orthodox American Jewish females. I begin this paper by exploring the conceptual framework of the Poland voyage as pilgrimage. Thematic analysis was used to address which themes surfaced when recent and veteran participants spoke of their trips to Poland, with particular emphasis placed on how participants felt they were impacted and/or transformed by the journey. By exploring how six participants engaged with, interpreted and synthesized their experiences of Heritage Seminars, I draw conclusions about the impact of the Poland pilgrimage on a sample of Modern Orthodox American Jewish females.

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The Role of the Jewish Women in the 1944 Sonderkommando Uprising in Birkenau

Ronnen Harran

by Ronnen Harran

This research attempts to delve into the details below the surface, both during the period preceding the uprising and the period following it. On the one hand, it traces the preceding events, the establishment and execution of the gunpowder smuggling activity and reevaluates them, and on the other hand it delineates the German investigation that followed the uprising, which led to the imprisonment of four Jewish women and to their execution – all while evaluating multiple testimonies and documents, some of which have not yet been subjected to research.

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Chronicle of Destruction: The Jews of Raseiniai County during WWII and the Holocaust

Nataliby Natali Beige

This research attempts to delve into the details below the surface, both during the period preceding the uprising and the period following it. On the one hand, it traces the preceding events, the establishment and execution of the gunpowder smuggling activity and reevaluates them, and on the other hand it delineates the German investigation that followed the uprising, which led to the imprisonment of four Jewish women and to their execution – all while evaluating multiple testimonies and documents, some of which have not yet been subjected to research.

 

The Masa to Poland and Kibbutz Narratives of Holocaust Memory: A Case Study of Kibbutz Yagur

NaomiSchusterby Naomi Schuster

The study begins with a brief outline of the history of the masa to Poland from the Carmel Zvulun Regional High School located on Kibbutz Yagur. It then continues to explore the possible ways in which kibbutz ideological principles and Zionist values have been transmitted to the current generation of kibbutznikim. The next section of the thesis is focused on understanding the impact the masa has on the students born and raised on the kibbutz as compared to non-kibbutz participants from the regional high school. The final chapter examines the patterns of Holocaust commemoration throughout Israel’s history.

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Behind the lists. A close analysis of three transports from the Netherlands to ‘the East’, 1942-1943

Alineby Aline Pennewaard

Three transport lists from the Netherlands are analyzed in order to determine a pattern in which the Nazis deported the Dutch Jews: the first transport on July 15, 1942; the first transport to Sobibór on March 2, 1943 and the last transport of 1943, the one on November 16, 1943. The transport lists were used for the book In memoriam l’zecher (1995), which contains all the names of the 104.000 Dutch Jews who didn’t return from the concentration camps. The 102 transport lists have never been studied together as a whole.

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The Jüdischer Kulturbund Filmbühne and the Jewish-German Community in the Third Reich, 1938-1941

Leah Hansenby Leah Hansen

This thesis first reconstructs the Filmbühne itself, including who attended the film screenings, what was shown, the cinema’s function within the larger Kulturbund organization, and why the Nazi authorities allowed it to exist. The following chapter analyzes diaries, essays, and letters of personal correspondence in order to determine how individual German Jews interacted with the cinema. The final chapter is devoted to the ways in which films were presented to the Jewish community in Germany through film reviews in the Jüdisches Nachrichtenblatt, the only surviving Jewish newspaper at the time.  

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A Question of Faith: Children of the Kindertransporte and Their Search for Jewish Identity

AriellaEsterson

by Ariella Esterson

For many children growing up in Europe during the Third Reich, the Kindertransport was their only hope of survival. Once arriving in England, the children and youth, had very different experiences. Whether they had been assimilated into German culture or came from religiously observant homes, the children were placed in Jewish homes, private Christian homes, hostels, or schools, with varying religious observance. This analysis focuses on the different experiences that the Kindertransport children had as it pertains to how they preserved the religious identity developed in Germany, and explains how those experiences shaped their future religious identities and levels of faith as adults.

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JEWS SAVING JEWS – INDIVIDUAL INITIATIVES DURING THE HOLOCAUST, 1939-1945

Noa Gidronby Noa Gidron

The focal point of this paper is Jews acting on their own initiative to save lives while trapped in the Nazi regime during the war years 1939-1945. The paper presents a complete picture of this phenomenon by reviewing and classifying separate events of rescue initiatives by individual Jews: Educators and caregivers who tried to save children; Functionaries in the camps who used their positions to save others; Rescue initiatives of medical crews; Private initiatives to rescue through smuggling and immigration; Rescuing in family camps based in forests and the rescue activities of individual prisoners targeted at fellow prisoners.

 

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A Comparative Analysis of the Discourse on the "Bystander" in the United States and Israel

audrey2by Audrey Zada

This thesis asks how the term "bystander" is used in Holocaust discourse to reflect larger, national aspects of Israeli and American narratives of the Holocaust by closely analyzing the two national Holocaust museums from these countries, Yad Vashem and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It explores how the term "bystander" became popular in relation to the Holocaust by examining its development in social psychology, historiography of the Holocaust and practical applications in international law policy. This thesis argues the idea of the "bystander" is in fact presented differently in Israel and the United States.

Holocaust Museums and Artifacts: Linking History and Culture

GabrielMayerby Gabriel Mayer

This thesis entails an examination of three prominent Holocaust museums: Yad Vashem and Ghetto Fighters’ House Museum (GFH) in Israel and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC. The research work included a number of interviews with individuals closely linked and involved during the developmental stages of each museum, along with examination of internal documents, whenever available. The museums were seen as representing an ethos, mostly shared as regards Holocaust narrativization, while the artifacts-individually and as items of acquisition and collections-addressed ethnos, relayed individual agency and represented personalized narrativization.

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Strochliz Institute for Holocaust Research
University of Haifa
1 Abba Hushi Blvd.
Mt. Carmel, Haifa 3478601,
Israel.
Tel: +972+48240613
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Sunday through Thursday
email: ygranot@univ.haifa.ac.il